Question: What Are Some Irish Slang Words?

What is Irish for goodbye?

A slang phrase rumored to have originated in the Northeast, an “Irish goodbye” refers to a person ducking out of a party, social gathering or very bad date without bidding farewell..

What do the Irish say instead of Cheers?

SláinteBe sure to end your toast off with a hearty “Sláinte!” (pronounced slawn-CHA). It means “Health!” and is the Irish equivalent to “Cheers!”

What should you not say in Ireland?

10 Things Tourists Should Never Say in Ireland“I’m Irish”Quizzing about potatoes.Anything about an Irish car bomb.“Top of the morning to you”“Everything is better in… (insert large city)”“St Patty’s Day”“Do you know so-and-so from…”“I love U2”More items…•

What are some Irish words?

Up to 90: Ireland in our favourite words and phrasesShebeen. From the Irish “síbín”, this is the first of many words in this list related to general divilment and rúla búla. … Gubu. The acronym for “grotesque, unbelievable, bizarre and unprecedented” can now refer to any political or legal wrangling. … Begrudgery. … Sap. … Craic. … Mot or moth. … Gob. … Hooligan.More items…•

What’s the story Irish slang?

“How’s the craic?” or “s’craic?” meaning “what’s up?”, “what’s happening?”, “what’s the story?”, or just “hello”/”how are ya?”A typical response is “divil a bit,” which means “not much.”

What is the famous Irish prayer?

May the wind be always at your back. May the sun shine warm upon your face; the rains fall soft upon your fields and until we meet again, … Originally written in the Irish language, the prayer – the author is unknown – has three main images, namely wind, sun, and rain.

What is a fanny in Ireland?

Fanny pack: The term fanny in Irish is applied exclusively to female genitalia, so whatever you are wearing, it isn’t a fanny pack; it’s a waist-belt or a waist-pouch.

What does Chucky mean in Irish?

Chucky. an English-language pronunciation spelling of tiocfaidh, it is pejorative for an Irish republican (sometimes shortened to Chuck).

What is the most Irish thing to say?

Here are 15 Irish expressions to break out on St. Paddy’s Day:May the road rise up to meet you. … Sláinte! … What’s the craic? … May the cat eat you, and may the devil eat the cat. … Two people shorten the road. … Story horse? … On me tod. … Acting the maggot.More items…•

What do the Irish call a girl?

An Irish word for a young girl.

What is an Irish kiss?

Ingredients. ¾ oz of Tullamore Dew Irish Whiskey. ½ oz of peach schnapps. 4 oz of ginger ale. 2 oz of orange juice.

What is an Irish proverb?

A proverb for every occasion! ‘Seanfhocal’ is the Irish word for proverb, literally meaning ‘old word’. The following proverbs have been around for centuries. They were originally told in Gaelic but have since migrated into the English language too.

Why do Irish say Feck?

And then there is the Irish slang feck “steal, take”, which the Chambers Dictionary of Slang says may originate in Old English feccan “to fetch, gain, take”, or German fegen “to plunder”. We see this usage in James Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man: Because they had fecked cash out of the rector’s room.

What is an Irish Hello?

The most common way of saying hello in Irish is Dia dhuit, pronounced, jee-ah-gwitch. You might also hear it pronounced as jee-ah-gwit or. jee-ah ditch. If you are saying hello in Irish to more than one person then you would use, Dia Daoibh which is pronounced jee-uh dee-uv or jee-uh dee-iv.

What are some Irish blessings?

16 of the best Irish blessings and toasts for all occasionsMay the best day of your past be the worst day of your future. … May the lilt of Irish laughter lighten every load.May the mist of Irish magic shorten every road and may your friends remember the favours you are owed.Let your heart be glad for the harvest done and may your winter be warm the whole season long.More items…•

What do the Irish call their friends?

Mucker. Mate, pal, friend.

What does the O mean in Irish names?

A male’s surname generally takes the form Ó/Ua (meaning “descendant”) or Mac (“son”) followed by the genitive case of a name, as in Ó Dónaill (“descendant of Dónall”) or Mac Lochlainn (“son of Lochlann”). A son has the same surname as his father.

Are the Irish lucky?

“During the gold and silver rush years in the second half of the 19th century, a number of the most famous and successful miners were of Irish and Irish American birth…. Over time this association of the Irish with mining fortunes led to the expression ‘luck of the Irish. ‘