Quick Answer: What Comes After Arraignment Hearing?

Should I plead not guilty at arraignment?

You should definitely plead NOT GUILTY to your criminal or traffic charge.

The first court hearing is called an arraignment.

If you were to plead “guilty,” the Judge would set your sentence on each of your charges to whatever he or she wants within the minimum and maximum sentence allowed by law..

Why plead not guilty when you are?

By pleading not guilty, the criminal defendant buys time. … The criminal defense lawyer may explain the defendant’s rights. He or she may be able to work on motions to keep damaging evidence from being entered and to show that the prosecution does not have sufficient evidence to establish the defendant’s guilt.

Should I get a lawyer before arraignment?

You can go to arraignment and plead not guilty, without an attorney; however, depending on whether you are charged with a misdemeanor or a felony, the steps and process will vary.

How long does an arraignment hearing take?

The time before the judge is very short…often less than a minute unless there are lengthy bail arguments. That being said, it could take over an hour for your case to called depending on County and whether or not you have private counsel.

Do you go to jail right after arraignment?

At arraignments, people are taken into custody for 3 reasons: A Judge Orders Bail. … In most cases, as we have our clients prearrange and qualify for bail, posting bail takes about 2-4 hours to post and then however long it takes the local jail to process you and release you.

On what grounds can a case be dismissed?

An order to dismiss a case can occur when the appellate court, having reversed the conviction on the grounds of a bad search or arrest, examines what’s left of the case and determines that there is not enough evidence to warrant another trial.

Do lawyers go to arraignment?

Typically, your first opportunity to ask the court to appoint a lawyer for you will be at your first court appearance, normally called your arraignment or bail hearing. … If you don’t qualify for free help but can’t afford the full cost of a private lawyer, you may still obtain the services of a court-appointed attorney.

What are the steps in arraignment?

Steps in a Criminal CaseStep 1: Arraignment. The first step in a criminal case is a court appearance called an arraignment, in which the charges against the defendant are read before a judge.Step 2: Preliminary Hearing. … Step 3: 2nd Arraignment (Superior Court) … Step 4: Pretrial Hearing & Motions. … Step 5: Jury Trial.

Is evidence presented at arraignment?

The process is similar to a grand jury hearing in which evidence and testimony is offered by the prosecution but the defense does not usually present evidence. … A preliminary hearing is held if the defendant pleads not guilty at his or her arraignment.

What happens if you plead not guilty but are found guilty?

The defendant can change their plea from not guilty to guilty at any time. If the defendant decides to plead guilty before the trial, you won’t be required to give evidence in court. … If the defendant pleads guilty or is found guilty after the trial, they will be sentenced by the court.

Can the public attend an arraignment hearing?

Yes, since it is typically an open court to the public so anyone can attend.

What can I expect at an arraignment hearing?

At arraignment, the court must inform the defendant of the charges against him. In some states, the judge must read the criminal complaint, indictment, information, or another charging document to the defendant unless the defendant waives the reading.

Which comes first preliminary hearing or arraignment?

A preliminary hearing is best described as a “trial before the trial” at which the judge decides, not whether the defendant is “guilty” or “not guilty,” but whether there is enough evidence to force the defendant to stand trial. In contrast, an arraignment is where the defendant may file their pleas.

Can more charges be added after arraignment?

The indictment can be amended at any time with leave of the court or the consent of the accused: s 20. The amendment can include the addition of further charges.